BPPV and Christmas TreesIt’s that time a year for the annual trip to the Christmas tree lot. When a person has Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV), bending the head down, or tipping the head back, can trigger a vertigo spell. It goes without saying, that if you are standing on a ladder and reaching overhead to hang something on a tree, you definitely don’t want the world to spin!

So this is a tip for those with holiday cheer and vertigo, let someone else do the ladders, and the reaching overhead and bending over! If you have positional vertigo, aim for the ornaments in the middle of the tree where you can keep your head level. This way you won’t have to worry about triggering the vertigo, and potentially falling and getting hurt during the holiday session. Or, if you live alone, you could get a smaller tree this year that is 3 feet tall, and place it on a small table so that you can decorate it without having to tip you head back or bend over too much…

For those of you with balance problems or BPPV, give yourself the present you deserve, and go and see a trained vestibular specialist and get treated for your problem. That would be the best present of all!

Happy Holidays! - Dr. Laura Wazen, Equinox Physical Therapy 941-404-4567

Published in Blog

Le Golf PaintingPainting: Le golf by Emilio Grau Sala, 1961

BPPV hit the international stage this last week at the 2015 US Open Golf Tournament in Chambers Bay when Australian golfer Jason Day suffered an attack of vertigo and fell to the ground. It’s not every day that people all over the world are talking about and witnessing the debilitating effects of a vertigo attack...


I have been surfing the net, looking at the video footage, and listening to and reading the various commentaries that people are posting. The bottom line is that BPPV is a real drag, and it is horrible in general, but especially difficult if you are trying to play golf. Why do I say that? It is because we know that head or body motions trigger BPPV. The crystals in the inner ear become out of place, and when we bend over, tip our head down or back, or turn quickly, it can trigger the vertigo. Needless to say, it is pretty difficult to play golf without bending over or turning your head quickly, not to mention playing championship level golf and competing with people who are not having this problem.


The good news is that BPPV can be treated! Living in South Florida, I treat a lot of golfers who have this condition. All they want is for the vertigo to go away so that they can get back on the golf course. My BPPV patients in Sarasota, Florida couldn’t stop talking about Jason Day, because they knew how he felt, and hoped that this international exposure of the condition might help others understand what they are going through.


The most common treatment for BPPV is a repositioning maneuver where the head is moved in a certain way in order to put the crystals back in the part of the ear where they belong so that the person no longer has vertigo. There are several treatments that will do this, including the Epley Maneuver, Semont Maneuver, or the Foster Maneuver. These 3 treatments are for the Posterior canal. (The inner ear has 3 canals and each canal requires a different treatment). If maneuvers do not work, there is a surgery to occlude the canal where the crystals are floating, but this surgery is only done in the worst of cases and for very few people since most people respond to the repositioning maneuvers. Also, sometimes BPPV goes away on it’s own.


If you are having vertigo, you need the proper diagnosis in order to get the proper cure. Some of the people who were commenting on the Internet were talking about other causes of vertigo, such as Meniere’s Disease, and offering advice on what they do to control their vertigo. The treatments for BPPV and Meniere’s Disease are completely different, and what works to help Meniere’s Disease does not work to treat BPPV (and vice versa). I would recommend that if you are having vertigo, do not take antidotal advise from a layman with no medical training. Go and see an Otologist (an ENT physician who specializes in treating inner ear problems), or a vestibular therapist (a physical therapist who specializes in treating inner ear problems) who can test you for this problem and get down to business in helping you find the correct answer to your problem.

Published in Blog
Thursday, 08 October 2015 12:31

Can People Have BPPV in Both Ears?

Sergey SolomkoBPPV (Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo) is the most common type of inner ear problem, comprising approximately 25% of all inner ear problems. It is caused when crystals in the ear that are supposed to sit on top of the nerve fibers in a jelly like matrix, become loose and start floating in the semi-circular canals of the ear. When this happens, the person can experience a spinning sensation (vertigo) that lasts for seconds and is triggered by changes in head or body position. For instance, it happens when getting in/out of bed, bending over, or tipping your head back.

In answer to the question, “Can people have BPPV in both ears?” the answer is YES. About 40% of people can have it in both ears at the same time. The good news is that if the condition does not go away on its own, it can be treated with maneuvers to guide the crystals back into the part of the ear where they belong.

If you think you have BPPV, I encourage you to find a qualified doctor or physical therapist, who can test to see if BPPV is your problem, and if it is in one ear or both ears. The proper testing leads to the proper treatment, and to the proper cure…

Painting entitled,  A Serious Question, by Sergey Solomko

Published in Blog
Wednesday, 17 December 2014 14:56

BPPV and Christmas Trees- A Holiday Tip

Holiday TipsIt’s that time a year for the annual trip to the Christmas tree lot. Last week I went with my family to find the perfect tree. We walked around and around each tree, trying to find the one that looked just right. We were tipping our head back to look at the top of the tree, and then looking down to examine the bottom of the tree, searching for the perfect shape and height… We looked at so many trees! When we got home, we had to tip our heads back when we reached overhead to pull the tree off the roof of the SUV. Then we carried the bulky, heavy, awkward tree into the house. Once the tree was set up, which was tricky on it’s own, we climbed up and down ladders putting the star on top, not to mention the lights and the ornaments! Then I had to get down on my hands and knees and crawl under the tree to pour a pitcher of water in the container for the tree to drink.

I couldn’t help but think of my balance therapy patients in Sarasota, Florida, and of my patients with positional vertigo (BPPV). I was praying that they weren’t doing the same thing I was doing, and that I wouldn’t come in to work on Monday morning to find out that someone had fallen and gotten hurt.

Can you imagine doing all these things if you had vertigo? When a person has Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV), bending the head down, or tipping the head back, can trigger a vertigo spell. It goes without saying, that if you are standing on a ladder and reaching overhead to hang something on a tree, you definitely don’t want the world to spin!

So this is a tip for those with holiday cheer and vertigo, let someone else do the ladders, and the reaching overhead and bending over! If you have positional vertigo, aim for the ornaments in the middle of the tree where you can keep your head level. This way you won’t have to worry about triggering the vertigo, and potentially falling and getting hurt during the holiday session. Or, if you live alone, you could get a smaller tree this year that is 3 feet tall, and place it on a small table so that you can decorate it without having to tip you head back or bend over too much…

And also, for those of you with balance problems and BPPV, give yourself the present you deserve, and go and see a trained vestibular specialist and get treated for your problem, so that you can enjoy all the festivities that this time of year brings, but without the vertigo or imbalance! That would be the best present of all!

Published in Blog

BPPVBPPV is a condition of the inner ear where the crystals in the ear that are supposed to be sitting on top of the nerve fibers become dislodged and start floating in the semi circular canals. When this happens, it can trigger symptoms of vertigo (a spinning sensation), dizziness, or imbalance. Unlike other inner ear symptoms, vertigo caused by BPPV lasts seconds, not for extended minutes, hours or days.

Top 5 Motions that can trigger BPPV listed in no particular order:
1. Vertigo or dizziness when getting in or out of bed.
2. Vertigo or dizziness when rolling over in bed.
3. Vertigo or dizziness when tipping your head back to look overhead.
4. Vertigo or dizziness when bending over.
5. Vertigo or dizziness when moving your head or body quickly.

Motion, 1962  an Abstract Painting by  Ernst Wilhelm Nay

Published in Blog

Dr. Laura Wazen

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Listen. Listening is the most important step in understanding a patient’s concern. It is the most basic beginning, and in health care today, so often undervalued. It directs understanding, direction of testing, and formulation of a plan. It is the most important step in paving the road to treatment and recovery.

Learn. My role is not only to learn from my patients, but to guide them in how to learn from me, what they should do to take back their lives and create positive change.

Live. Life is a gift. The purpose of all treatment at Equinox Physical Therapy is to restore function, independence, and freedom to clients recovering from or living with an illness.

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Dizziness

BPPV

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